List Of Cases Of Witchcraft 1558-1718 With References To Sources And Literature





1558. John Thirkle, "taylour, detected of conjuringe," to be

examined. Acts of Privy Council, n. s., VII, 6.



---- Several persons in London charged with conjuration to

be sent to the Bishop of London for examination.

Ibid., 22.



1559. Westminster. Certain persons examined on suspicion,

including probably Lady Frances Throgmorton. Cal.

St. P., Dom., 1547-1580, 142.



c. 1559. Lady Chandos's daughter accused and imprisoned

with George Throgmorton. Brit Mus., Add. MSS.,

32,091, fol. 176.



1560. Kent. Mother Buske of St. John's suspected by the

church authorities. Visitations of Canterbury in

Archaeologia Cantiana, XXVI, 31.



1561. Coxe, alias Devon, a Romish priest, examined for magic

and conjuration, and for celebrating mass. Cal. St.

P., Dom., 1547-1580, 173.



---- London. Ten men brought before the queen and council

on charge of "trespass, contempt, conjuration and

sorceries." Punished with the pillory and required

to renounce such practices for the future. From an

extract quoted in Brit. Mus., Sloane MSS., 3,943,

fol. 19.



1565. Dorset. Agnes Mondaye to be apprehended for bewitching

Mistress Chettell. Acts P. C., n. s., VII,

200-201.



1565-1573. Durham. Jennet Pereson accused to the church

authorities. Depositions ... from ... Durham (Surtees

Soc.), 99.



1566. Chelmsford, Essex. Mother Waterhouse hanged; Alice

Chandler hanged, probably at this time; Elizabeth

Francis probably acquitted. The examination and

confession of certaine Wytches at Chensforde. For

the cases of Elizabeth Francis and Alice Chandler

see also A detection of damnable driftes, A iv, A

v, verso.



---- Essex. "Boram's wief" probably examined by the

archdeacon. W. H. Hale, A Series of Precedents

and Proceedings in Criminal Causes, 1475-1640,

extracted from the Act Books of Ecclesiastical

Courts in the Diocese of London (London, 1847),

147.



1569. Lyme, Dorset. Ellen Walker accused. Roberts, Southern

Counties, 523.



1570. Essex. Malter's wife of Theydon Mount and Anne

Vicars of Navestock examined by Sir Thomas Smith.

John Strype, Life of Sir Thomas Smith (ed. of Oxford,

1820), 97-100.



1570-1571. Canterbury. Several witches imprisoned. Mother

Dungeon presented by the grand jury. Hist. MSS.

Comm. Reports, IX, pt. 1, 156 b; Wm. Welfitt,

"Civis," Minutes collected from the Ancient Records

of Canterbury (Canterbury, 1801-1802), no. VI.



---- ---- Folkestone, Kent. Margaret Browne, accused of

"unlawful practices," banished from town for seven

years, and to be whipped at the cart's tail if found

within six or seven miles of town. S. J. Mackie,

Descriptive and Historical Account of Folkestone

(Folkestone, 1883), 319.



1574. Westwell, Kent. "Old Alice" [Norrington?] arraigned

and convicted. Reginald Scot, Discoverie of Witchcraft,

130-131.



---- Middlesex. Joan Ellyse of Westminster convicted on

several indictments for witchcraft and sentenced to

be hanged. Middlesex County Records, I, 84.



c. 1574. Jane Thorneton accused by Rachel Pinder, who

however confessed to fraud. Discloysing of a late

counterfeyted possession.



1575. Burntwood, Staffordshire. Mother Arnold hanged at

Barking. From the title of a pamphlet mentioned

by Lowndes: The Examination and Confession of a

notorious Witch named Mother Arnold, alias Whitecote,

alias Glastonbury, at the Assise of Burntwood

in July, 1574; who was hanged for Witchcraft at

Barking, 1575. Mrs. Linton, Witch Stories, 153,

says that many were hanged at this time, but I cannot

find authority for the statement.



---- Middlesex. Elizabeth Ducke of Harmondsworth

acquitted. Middlesex County Records, I, 94.



---- Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. Katharine Smythe acquitted.

Henry Harrod, "Notes on the Records of the Corporation

of Great Yarmouth," in Norfolk Archaeology,

IV, 248.



1577. Seaford, Sussex. Joan Wood presented by the grand

jury. M. A. Lower, "Memorials of Seaford," in

Sussex Archaeological Soc., Collections, VII, 98.



---- Middlesex. Helen Beriman of Laleham acquitted.

Middlesex County Records, I, 103.



---- Essex. Henry Chittam of Much Barfield to be tried

for coining false money and conjuring. Acts P. C.,

n. s., IX, 391; X, 8, 62.



1578. Prescall, Sanford, and "one Emerson, a preiste," suspected

of conjuration against the queen. The first

two committed. Id., X, 382; see also 344, 373.



---- Evidence of the use of sorcery against the queen discovered.

Cal. St. P., Spanish, 1568-1579, 611; see

also note to Ben Jonson's Masque of Queenes (London,

Shakespeare Soc., 1848), 71.



---- Sussex. "One Tree, bailiff of Lewes, and one Smith

of Chinting" to be examined. Acts P. C., n. s., X, 220.



1579. Chelmsford, Essex. Three women executed. Mother

Staunton released because "no manslaughter objected

against her." A Detection of damnable driftes.



---- Abingdon, Berks. Four women hanged; at least two

others and probably more were apprehended. A

Rehearsall both straung and true of ... acts committed

by Elisabeth Stile ...; Acts P. C., n. s.,

XI, 22; Scot, Discoverie of Witchcraft, 10, 51, 543.



---- Certain persons suspected of sorcery to be examined

by the Bishop of London. Acts P. C., n. s., XI, 36.



---- Salop, Worcester, and Montgomery. Samuel Cocwra

paid for "searching for certen persons suspected

for conjuracion." Ibid., 292.



---- Southwark. Simon Pembroke, a conjurer, brought to the

parish church of St. Saviour's to be tried by the

"ordinarie judge for those parties," but falls dead

before the opening of the trial. Holinshed, Chronicles

(ed. of 1586-1587), III, 1271.



---- Southampton. Widow Walker tried by the leet jury,

outcome unknown. J. S. Davies, History of Southampton

(Southampton, 1883), 236.



1579-1580. Shropshire. Mother Garve punished in the corn

market. Owen and Blakeway, History of Shrewsbury,

I, 562.



1580. Stanhope, Durham. Ann Emerson accused by the

church officials. Injunctions ... of ... Bishop of

Durham (Surtees Soc.), 126.



---- Bucks. John Coleman and his wife examined by four

justices of the peace at the command of the privy

council. They were probably released. Acts P. C., n.

s., XI, 427; XII, 29.



---- Kent. Several persons to be apprehended for conjuration.

Id., XII, 21-23.



---- Somerset. Henry Harrison and Thomas Wadham, suspected

of conjuration, to appear before the privy

council. Ibid., 22-23.



---- Somerset. Henry Fize of Westpenner, detected in conjuration,

brought before the privy council. Ibid., 34.



---- Essex. "Sondery persones" charged with sorceries and

conjuration. Acts P. C., XII, 29, 34.



1581. Randoll and four others accused for "conjuring to

know where treasure was hid in the earth." Randoll

and three others found guilty. Randoll alone

executed. Holinshed, Chronicles (London, 1808),

IV, 433.



1581. Padstow, Cornwall. Anne Piers accused of witchcraft.

Examination of witnesses. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1581-1590,

29. See also Acts P. C., n. s., XIII, 228.



1581. Rochester, Kent. Margaret Simmons acquitted. Scot,

Discoverie, 5.



1581-82. Colchester, Essex. Annis Herd accused before the

"spiritual Courte." Witches taken at St. Oses, 1582.



1582. St. Osyth, Essex. Sixteen accused, one of whom was a

man. How many were executed uncertain. It seems

to have been a tradition that thirteen were executed.

Scot wrote that seventeen or eighteen were executed.

Witches taken at St. Oses, 1582; Scot, Discoverie, 543.



1582 (or before). "T. E., Maister of Art and practiser both of

physicke, and also in times past, of certeine vaine

sciences," condemned for conjuration, but reprieved.

Scot, Discoverie, 466-469.



1582. Middlesex. Margery Androwes of Clerkenwell held in

bail. Middlesex County Records, I, 133.



1582. Durham. Alison Lawe of Hart compelled to do penance.

Denham Tracts (Folk-Lore Soc.), II, 332.



1582. Kent. Goodwife Swane of St. John's suspected by the

church authorities. Archaeol. Cant., XXVI, 19.



1582-83. Nottingham. A certain Batte examined before the

"Meare" of Nottingham. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports,

XII, pt. 4, 147.



1582-83. King's Lynn. Mother Gabley probably hanged. Excerpt

from parish register of Wells in Norfolk, in

the Gentleman's Magazine, LXII (1792), 904.



1583. Kingston-upon-Hull, Yorkshire. Three women tried,

one sentenced to a year's imprisonment and the pillory.

J. J. Sheahan, History of Kingston-upon-Hull

(London, 1864), 86.



1583. Colchester, Essex. Two women sentenced to a year

in prison and to four appearances in the pillory. E.

L. Cutts, Colchester (London, 1888), 151. Henry

Harrod, Report on the Records of Colchester (Colchester,

1865), 17; App., 14.



1583. St. Peter's, Kent. Ellen Bamfield suspected by the

church authorities. Archaeol. Cant., XXVI, 45.



1584. Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. Elizabeth Butcher (punished

before) and Joan Lingwood condemned to be

hanged. C. J. Palmer, History of Great Yarmouth,

I, 273.



1584. Staffordshire. An indictment preferred against Jeffrey

Leach. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1581-1590, 206.



1584. "The oulde witche of Ramsbury" and several other

"oulde witches and sorcerers" suspected. Cal. St.

P., Dom., 1581-1590, 220.



1584. York. Woman, indicted for witchcraft and "high

treason touching the supremacy," condemned. Cal.

St. P., Dom., Add. 1580-1625, 120-121.



1584. Middlesex. Elizabeth Bartell of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields

acquitted. Middlesex County Records, I, 145.



1585. Middlesex. Margaret Hackett of Stanmore executed.

From titles of two pamphlets mentioned by Lowndes,

The severall Facts of Witchcrafte approved on Margaret

Haskett ... 1585, and An Account of Margaret

Hacket, a notorious Witch ... 1585.



1585. Middlesex. Joan Barringer of "Harroweelde" (Harrow

Weald) acquitted. Middlesex County Records,

I, 157.



1585. Dorset. John Meere examined. Cal. St. P., Dom.,

1581-90, 246-247.



1585-86. Alnwick, Northumberland. Two men and two women

committed to prison on suspicion of killing a sheriff.

Denham Tracts, II, 332; Cal. S. P., Dom., Add. 1580-1625, 168.



1586. Eckington, Derbyshire. Margaret Roper accused. Discharged.

Harsnett, Discovery of the Fraudulent

Practises of John Darrel, 310.



1586. Faversham, Kent. Jone Cason [Carson] tried before

the mayor, executed. Holinshed, Chronicles (1586-1587),

III, 1560.



1587. Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. Helena Gill indicted. C. J.

Palmer, History of Great Yarmouth, 273. H. Harrod

in Norfolk Archaeology, IV, 248, assigns this to

1597, but it is probably a mistake.



c. 1588. A woman at R. H. said to have been imprisoned and

to have died before the assizes. Gifford, Dialogue

(London, 1603), C.



1589. Chelmsford, Essex. Three women hanged. The apprehension

and confession of three notorious Witches.



1589. Several persons to be examined about their dealings in

conjuration with an Italian friar. Acts P. C., n. s.,

XVII, 31-32.



1589. Mrs. Deir brought into question for sorcery against

the queen. Charge dismissed. Strype, Annals of

the Reformation (London, 1709-1731), IV, 7-8.



1590. Mrs. Dewse suspected of attempting to make use of conjurors.

Cal. St. P., Dom., 1581-1590, 644.



1590. John Bourne, a "sorcerer and seducer," arrested. Acts

P. C., n. s., XVIII, 373.



1590. Berwick. A Scottish witch imprisoned. John Scott,

History of Berwick (London, 1888), 180; Archaeologia,

XXX, 172.



1590. Norfolk. Margaret Grame accused before justice of the

peace. Neighbors petition in her behalf. Hist. MSS.

Comm. Reports, Various, II, 243-244.



1590. King's Lynn. Margaret Read burnt. Benjamin Mackerell,

History and Antiquities ... of King's Lynn,

(London, 1738), 231.



1590. Edmonton, Middlesex. Certain men taken for witchcraft

and conjuring. Bloodhound used in pursuit

of them. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1581-1590, 689.



1590-91. Hertfordshire. Indictment of Joan White for killing.

Hertfordshire County Session Rolls, I, 4.



1591. John Prestall suspected. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1591-1594,

17-19.



1591. Middlesex. Stephen Trefulback of Westminster given

penalty of statute, i. e., probably pillory. Middlesex

County Records, I, 197.



1592. Colchester, Essex. Margaret Rand indicted by grand

jury. Brit. Mus., Stowe MSS., 840, fol. 42.



1592. Yorkshire. "Sara B. de C." examined. West, Symboleography,

pt. II (London, 1594), ed. of 1611, fol.

134 verso (reprinted in County Folk-Lore, Folk-Lore

Soc., 135). Whether the "S. B. de C. in comit.

H." whose indictment in the same year is printed

also by West may possibly be the same woman can

not be determined.



1592. Yorkshire. Margaret L. de A. examined. Ibid.



1593. Warboys, Huntingdonshire. Mother, daughter and

father Samuel executed. The most strange and

admirable discoverie of the three Witches of Warboys.

1593. See also John Darrel, A Detection of

that sinnful ... discours of Samuel Harshnet, 20-21,

39-40, 110. Harsnett, Discovery of the Fraudulent

Practises of John Darrel, 93, 97.



1594. Jane Shelley examined for using sorcerers to find the

time of the queen's death. Hist. MSS. Comm., Cecil., pt. V, 25.



1595. St. Peter's Kent. Two women presented by the church

authorities. Still suspected in 1599. Archaeol. Cant., XXVI, 46.



1595. Woodbridge, Suffolk. Witches put in the pillory.

County Folk-Lore, Suffolk (Folk-Lore Soc., London, 1895), 193.



1595. Jane Mortimer pardoned for witchcraft. Bodleian,

Tanner MSS., CLXVIII, fol. 29.



1595. Near Bristol, Somerset. Severall committed for the

Earl of Derby's death. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports,

IV, app., 366 b. See also E. Baines's Lancaster

(London, 1870), 273-274 and note.



1595. Barnet and Braynford, Herts. Three witches executed.

From title of pamphlet mentioned by Lowndes,

The Arraignment and Execution of 3 detestable

Witches, John Newell, Joane his wife, and Hellen

Calles: two executed at Barnett and one at Braynford,

1 Dec. 1595.



1596 (or before). Derbyshire. Elizabeth Wright (mother

of Alice Gooderidge) several times summoned before

the justice of the peace on suspicion. The

most wonderfull and true Storie of ... Alse Gooderidge

(1597).



1596. Burton-upon-Trent, Derbyshire. Alice Gooderidge tried

at Derby, convicted. Died in prison. Harsnett, Discovery

of the fraudulent Practises of John Darrel;

John Darrel, Detection of that sinnful ... discours

of Samuel Harshnet, 38, 40; The most wonderfull

and true Storie of ... Alse Gooderidge (1597).



1596-1597. Leicester. Mother Cooke hanged. Mary Bateson,

Records of the Borough of Leicester (Cambridge,

1899), III, 335.



1596-1597. Lancaster. Hartley condemned and executed.

John Darrel, True Narration (in the Somers Tracts,

III), 175, 176; George More, A True Discourse

concerning the certaine possession ... of 7 persons

... in Lancashire, 18-22; John Darrel, Detection

of that sinnful ... discours of Samuel Harshnet, 40.



1597. Nottingham. Thirteen or more accused by Somers, at

least eight of whom were put in gaol. All but two

discharged. Alice Freeman tried at the assizes and

finally acquitted. John Darrel, Detection of that

sinnful ... discours of Samuel Harshnet, 109-111;

An Apologie or defence of the possession of William

Sommers, L-L 3; Samuel Harsnett, Discovery

of the Fraudulent Practises of John Darrel, 5, 102,

140-141, 320-322.



1597. St. Lawrence, Kent. Sibilla Ferris suspected by the

church authorities. Archaeol. Cant., XXVI, 12.



1597. Nottingham. William Somers accused of witchcraft as

a ruse to get him into the house of correction.

Darrel, A True Narration of the ... Vexation ...

of seven persons in Lancashire, in Somers Tracts,

III, 184; also his Brief Apologie (1599), 17.



1597. Yorkshire. Elizabeth Melton of Collingham condemned,

pardoned. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1595-1597, 400.



1597. Lancashire. Alice Brerely of Castleton condemned,

pardoned. Ibid., 406.



1597. Middlesex. Agnes Godfrey of Enfield held by the justice

of the peace on L10 bail. Middlesex County Records, I, 237.



1597. St. Andrew's in Holborne, Middlesex. Josia Ryley

arraigned. "Po se mortuus in facie curie," i. e.

Posuit se moriturum. Ibid., 225.



1597. Middlesex. Helen Spokes of St. Giles-in-the-Fields

acquitted. Ibid., 239.



1598. Berwick. Richard Swynbourne's wife accused. John

Scott, History of Berwick (London, 1888), 180.



1598. St. Peter's, Kent. Two women suspected by the church

officials; one of them presented again the next year.

Archaeol. Cant., XXVI, 46.



1598. King's Lynn. Elizabeth Housegoe executed. Mackerell,

History and Antiquities of King's Lynn, 232.



1599. Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Jone Jordan of Shadbrook

tried. Darrel, A Survey of Certaine Dialogical

Discourses, 54.



1599. Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Joane Nayler tried. Ibid.



1599. Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Oliffe Bartham of Shadbrook

executed. The Triall of Maist. Dorrel, 92-98.



1599. London. Anne Kerke of Bokes-wharfe executed at

"Tiburn." The Triall of Maist. Dorrel, 99-103.



1600. Hertford. A "notable witch" committed to the gaol

at Hertford. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, Cecil

MSS., pt. X, 310.



1600. Rosa Bexwell pardoned. Bodleian, Tanner MSS.,

CLXVIII, fol. 104.



1600. Norfolk. Margaret Fraunces committed for a long

time. Probably released by justice of the peace on

new evidence. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, X, pt.

II (Gawdy MSS.), 71. See also below, pp. 400, 401.



1600. Ipswich, Suffolk. Several conjurers suspected. Cal.

St. P., Dom., 1598-1601, 523.



1601. Bishop Burton, York. Two women apprehended for

bewitching a boy. Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 32,496,

fol. 42 b.



1601. Middlesex. Richard Nelson of St. Katharine's arraigned.

Middlesex County Records, I, 260.



1601. Nottingham. Ellen Bark presented at the sessions.

Records of the Borough of Nottingham, IV, 260-261.



1602. Middlesex. Elizabeth Roberts of West Drayton indicted

on three charges, acquitted. Middlesex

County Records, I, 212.



1602. Saffron Walden, Essex. Alice Bentley tried before the

quarter sessions. Case probably dismissed. Darrel,

A Survey of Certaine Dialogical Discourses, 54.



temp. Eliz. Northfleet, Kent. Pardon to Alice S. for bewitching

a cow and pigs. Bodleian, Rawlinson MSS., C 404, fol. 205 b.



temp. Eliz. Woman condemned to prison and pillory. Gifford,

Dialogue concerning Witches (1603), L 4 verso.



temp. Eliz. Cambridge. Two women perhaps hanged at this

time. Henry More, Antidote to Atheisme, III. But

see 1605, Cambridge.



temp. Eliz. Mother W. of W. H. said to have been executed.

Gifford, Dialogue concerning Witches, D 4 verso--E.



temp. Eliz. Mother W. of Great T. said to have been hanged.

Ibid., C 4.



temp. Eliz. Woman said to have been hanged. Ibid., L 3-L 3 verso.



temp. Eliz. Two women said to have been hanged. Ibid., I 3 verso.



1602-1603. London. Elizabeth Jackson sentenced, for bewitching

Mary Glover, to four appearances in the pillory

and a year in prison. John Swan, A True and Breife

Report of Mary Glover's Vexation; E. Jorden, A

briefe discourse of ... the Suffocation of the

Mother, 1603; also a MS., Marie Glover's late woefull

case ... upon occasion of Doctor Jordens discourse

of the Mother, wherein hee covertly taxeth,

first the Phisitiones which judged her sicknes a vexation

of Sathan and consequently the sentence of

Lawe and proceeding against the Witche who was

discovered to be a meanes thereof, with A defence

of the truthe against D. J. his scandalous Impugnations,

by Stephen Bradwell, 1603. Brit. Mus., Sloane

MSS., 831. An account by Lewis Hughes, appended

to his Certaine Grievances (1641-2), is quoted

by Sinclar, Satan's Invisible World Discovered

(Edinburgh, 1685), 95-100; and hence Burton (The

Kingdom of Darkness) and Hutchinson (Historical

Essay concerning Witchcraft) assign a wrong date.



1603. Yorkshire. Mary Pannel executed for killing in 1593.

Mayhall, Annals of Yorkshire (London, 1878), I,

58. See also E. Fairfax, A Discourse of Witchcraft,

179-180.



1603. Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. Ales Moore in gaol on suspicion.

C. J. Palmer, History of Great Yarmouth, II, 70.



1604. Wooler, Northumberland. Katherine Thompson and

Anne Nevelson proceeded against by the Vicar General

of the Bishop of Durham. Richardson, Table

Book, I, 245; J. Raine, York Depositions, 127, note.



1605. Cambridge. A witch alarm. Letters of Sir Thomas

Lake to Viscount Cranbourne, January 18, 1604/5,

and of Sir Edward Coke to Viscount Craybourne,

Jan. 29, 1604/5, both in Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 6177,

fol. 403. This probably is the affair referred to in

Cal. St. P., Dom., 1603-1610, 218. Nor is it impossible

that Henry More had this affair in mind when

he told of two women who were executed in Cambridge

in the time of Elizabeth (see above, temp.

Eliz., Cambridge) and was two or three years astray

in his reckoning.



1605. Doncaster, York. Jone Jurdie of Rossington examined.

Depositions in Gentleman's Magazine, 1857, pt. I, 593-595.



1606. Louth, Lincolnshire. "An Indictment against a Witche."

R. W. Goulding, Louth Old Corporation Records

(Louth, 1891), 54.



1606. Hertford. Johanna Harrison and her daughter said to

have been executed. This rests upon the pamphlet

The Most Cruell and Bloody Murther, ... See appendix

A, Sec. 3.



1606. Richmond, Yorkshire. Ralph Milner ordered by quarter

sessions to make his submission at Mewkarr

Church. North Riding Record Society, I, 58.



1607. Middlesex. Alice Bradley of Hampstead arraigned on

four bills, acquitted. Middlesex County Records,

II, 8.



1607. Middlesex. Rose Mersam of Whitecrosse Street acquitted.

Ibid., II, 20.



1607. Bakewell, Derby. Several women said to have been executed

here. See Robert Simpson, A Collection of

Fragments illustrative of the History and Antiquities

of Derby (Derby, 1826), 90; Glover, History of

Derby (ed. Thos. Noble, 1833), pt. I, vol. II, p. 613;

J. C. Cox, Three Centuries of Derbyshire Annals,

II, 88. For what purports to be a detailed account

of the affair see W. Andrews, Bygone Derbyshire,

180-184.



1607-11. Rye, Sussex. Two women condemned by local

authorities probably discharged upon interference

from London. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, XIII,

pt. 4, 136-137, 139-140, 147-148.



1608. Simon Read pardoned. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1603-1610, 406.



1610. Norfolk. Christian[a] Weech, pardoned in 1604, now

again pardoned. Ibid., 96, 598. Was this the Christiana

Weekes of Cleves Pepper, Wilts, who in 1651

and 1654 was again and again accused of telling

where lost goods were? See Hist. MSS. Comm.

Reports, Various, I, 120.



1610. Middlesex. Agnes Godfrey of Enfield, with four bills

against her, acquitted on three, found guilty of killing.

File containing sentence lost. Middlesex County

Records, II, 57-58. Acquitted again in 1621. Ibid.,

79, 80.



1610. Leicestershire. Depositions taken by the sheriff concerning

Randall and other witches. Hist. MSS.

Comm. Reports, XII, pt. 4 (MSS. of the Duke of

Rutland), I, 422.



1611. Carnarvon. Story of witchcraft "committed on six

young maids." Privy Council orders the Bishop of

Bangor and the assize judges to look into it. Cal.

St. P., Dom., 1611-1618, 53.



1611. Wm. Bate, indicted twenty years before for practising

invocation, etc., for finding treasure, pardoned. Ibid., 29.



1611. Thirsk, Yorkshire. Elizabeth Cooke presented by quarter

sessions for slight crime related to witchcraft.

North Riding Record Soc., I, 213.



1612. Lancaster. Margaret Pearson, who in 1612 was sentenced

to a year's imprisonment and the pillory, had

been twice tried before, once for killing, and once for

bewitching a neighbor. Potts, Wonderfull Discoverie

of Witches in the countie of Lancaster

(Chetham Soc., 1845).



1612. Lancaster. Ten persons of Pendle sentenced to death,

one to a year's imprisonment; eight acquitted including

three women of Salmesbury. Potts, Wonderfull

Discoverie of Witches, Chetham Soc., 1845.

But cf. Cooper's words (Mystery of Witchcraft,

1617), 15.



1612. York. Jennet Preston sentenced to death. Potts,

Wonderfull Discoverie of Witches.



1612. Northampton. At least four women and one man

hanged. Many others accused, one of whom died in

gaol. The Witches of Northamptonshire, 1612; also

Brit Mus., Sloane MSS., 972, fol. 7.



1613. Bedford. Mother Sutton and Mary Sutton, her daughter,

of Milton Miles hanged. Witches Apprehended,

Examined and Executed, 1613. See app. A, Sec. 3,

for mention of another pamphlet on the same subject,

A Booke of the Wytches lately condemned and

executed. See also The Wonderful Discoverie of ...

Margaret and Phillip Flower, preface, and Richard

Bernard, Guide to Grand Jurymen, III.



1613. Wilts. Margaret Pilton of Warminster, accused at

quarter sessions, probably released. Hist. MSS.

Comm. Reports, Various, I, 86-87.



1614. Middlesex. Dorothy Magick of St. Andrew's in Holborn

sentenced to a year's imprisonment and four

appearances in the pillory. Middlesex County Records,

II, 91, 218.



1615. Middlesex. Joan Hunt of Hampstead, who had been,

along with her husband, twice tried and acquitted,

and whose accuser had been ordered to ask forgiveness,

sentenced to be hanged. Middlesex County

Records, II, lii, 95, 110, 217-218.



1616. Leicester. Nine women hanged on the accusation of a

boy. Six others accused, one of whom died in prison,

five released after the king's examination of the

boy. Robert Heyrick's letters from Leicester, July

16 and October 15, 1616, reprinted in the Annual

Register, 1800, p. 405. See also Cal. S. P., Dom.,

1611-1618, 398, and William Kelly, Royal Progresses

in Leicester (Leicester, 1855), pt. II, 15.



1616. King's Lynn, Norfolk. Mary Smith hanged. Alexander

Roberts, Treatise of Witchcraft (London, 1616);

Mackerell, History and Antiquities of King's Lynn, 233.



1616. Middlesex. Elizabeth Rutter of Finchley, for laming

and killing three persons, sentenced to be hanged.

Middlesex County Records, II, 108, 218.



1616. Middlesex. Margaret Wellan of London accused "upon

suspition to be a witch." Andrew Camfield held in

L40 bail to appear against her. Middlesex County

Records, II, 124-125.



1617. Middlesex. Agnes Berrye of Enfield sentenced to be

hanged. Ibid., 116, 219.



1617. Middlesex. Anne Branche of Tottenham arraigned on

four counts, acquitted. Ibid., 219.



1618. Middlesex. Bridget Meakins acquitted. Ibid., 225.



1619. Lincoln. Margaret and Philippa Flower hanged. Their

mother, Joan Flower, died on the way to prison.

The Wonderful Discoverie of the Witchcrafts of

Margaret and Phillip Flower; J. Nichols, History

and Antiquities of the County of Leicester (1795-1815),

II, pt. I, 49; Cal. St. P., Dom., 1619-1623, 129;

Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, Rutland MSS., IV, 514.



1619. Leicester. Three women, Anne Baker, Joan Willimot,

Ellen Green, accused and confessed. Doubtless executed.

The Wonderful Discoverie of the Witchcrafts

of Margaret and Phillip Flower.



1619. Middlesex. Agnes Miller of Finchley acquitted. Middlesex

County Records, II, 143-144.



1620. London. "One Peacock, sometime a schoolmaster and

minister," for bewitching the king, committed to the

Tower and tortured. Williams, Court and Times

of James I, II, 202; Cal. St. P., Dom., 1619-1623, 125.



1620. Leicester. Gilbert Smith, rector of Swithland, accused of

witchcraft among other things. Leicestershire and

Rutland Notes and Queries, I, 247.



1620. Padiham, Lancashire. Witches in prison. House and

Farm Accounts of the Shuttleworths, pt. II. (Chetham

Soc., 1856), 240.



1620. Staffordshire. Woman accused on charges of the "boy

of Bilson" acquitted. The Boy of Bilson (London,

1622); Arthur Wilson, Life and Reign of James I,

107-112; Webster, Displaying of Supposed Witchcraft,

274-275.



1621. Edmonton, Middlesex. Elizabeth Sawyer hanged. The

wonderfull discoverie of Elizabeth Sawyer, by

Henry Goodcole (1621).



1621. Middlesex. Anne Beaver, accused of murder on six

counts, acquitted. Middlesex County Records, II,

72-73. Acquitted again in 1625. Ibid., III, 2.



1622. York. Six women indicted for bewitching Edward Fairfax's

children. At April assizes two were released

upon bond, two and probably four discharged. At

the August assizes they were again acquitted. Fairfax,

A Discourse of Witchcraft (Philobiblon Soc.,

London, 1858-1859).



1622. Middlesex. Margaret Russel, alias "Countess," committed

to Newgate by Sir Wm. Slingsby on a charge

by Lady Jennings of injuring her daughter. Dr. Napier

diagnosed the daughter's illness as epilepsy.

Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 36,674, fol. 134.



1623. Yorkshire. Elizabeth Crearey of North Allerton sentenced

to be set in the pillory once a quarter. Thirsk

Quarter Sessions Records in North Riding Record

Society (London, 1885), III, 177, 181.



1624. Bristol. Two witches said to have been executed. John

Latimer, The Annals of Bristol in the Seventeenth

Century (Bristol, 1900), 91. Latimer quotes from

another "annalist."



temp. Jac. I? Two women said to have been hanged. Story

doubtful. Edward Poeton, Winnowing of White

Witchcraft (Brit. Mus., Sloane MSS., 1,954), 41-42.



temp. Jac. I. Norfolk. Joane Harvey accused for scratching

"an olde witche" there, "Mother Francis nowe

deade." Mother Francis had before been imprisoned

at Norwich. Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 28,223, fol. 15.



temp. Jac. I. Warwickshire. Coventry haunted by "hellish sorcerers."

"The pestilent brood" also in Cheshire.

Thomas Cooper, The Mystery of Witchcraft (1617),13, 16.



temp. Jac. I. Norwich. Witches probably accused for illness

of a child. Possibly Mother Francis was one of

them. Cooper, ibid., "Epistle Dedicatorie."



1626. Taunton, Somerset. Edmund Bull and Joan Greedie

accused. Brit. Mus., Add. MSS., 36,674, fol. 189;

Wright, Narratives of Sorcery and Magic, II, 139-143.

See also Richard Bernard, Guide to Grand

Jurymen, "Epistle Dedicatorie."



1627. Durham. Sara Hathericke and Jane Urwen accused

before the Consistory Court. Folk-Lore Journal

(London, 1887), V, 158. Quoted by Edward Peacock

from the records of the Consistory Court of Durham.



1627. Linneston, Lancaster. Elizabeth Londesdale accused.

Certificate of neighbors in her favor. Hist. MSS.

Comm. Reports, XIV, pt. 4 (Kenyon MSS.), 36.



1628. Leepish, Northumberland. Jane Robson committed.

Mackenzie, History of Northumberland (Newcastle,

1825), 36. Mackenzie copies from the Mickleton MS.



1630. Lancaster. A certain Utley said to have been hanged

for bewitching Richard Assheton. E. Baines, Lancaster

(ed. of 1868-1870), II, 12.



1630. Sandwich, Kent. Woman hanged. Wm. Boys, Collections

for an History of Sandwich in Kent (Canterbury,

1792), 707.



c. 1630. Wilts. "John Barlowes wife" said to have been executed.

MS. letter of 1685-86 printed in the Gentleman's

Magazine, 1832, pt. I, 405-410.



1633. Louth, Lincolnshire. Witch alarm; two searchers appointed.

One witch indicted. Goulding, Louth

Old Corporation Records, 54.



c. 1633. Lancaster. The father and mother of Mary Spencer

condemned. Cal. S. P., Dom., 1634-1635, 79.



1633. Norfolk. Woman accused. No arrest made. Hist.

MSS. Comm. Reports, X, pt. 2 (Gawdy MSS.), p. 144.



1633-34. Lancaster. Several witches, probably seventeen,

tried and condemned. Reprieved by the king. For

the many references to this affair see above, chap.

VII, footnotes.



1634. Yorkshire. Four women of West Ayton presented for

telling "per veneficationem vel incantationem"

where certain stolen clothes were to be found.

Thirsk Quarter Sessions Records in North Riding

Record Society, IV, 20.



1635. Lancaster. Four witches condemned. Privy Council

orders Bishop Bridgeman to examine them. Two

died in gaol. The others probably reprieved. Hist.

MSS. Comm. Reports, XII, 2 (Cowper MSS., II),

77, 80.



1635. Leicester. Agnes Tedsall acquitted. Leicestershire and

Rutland Notes and Queries, I, 247.



1635. ----. Mary Prowting, who was a plaintiff before the

Star Chamber, accused of witchcraft. Accuser, who

was one of the defendants, exposed. Cal. St. P.,

Dom., 1635, 476-477.



c. 1637. Bedford. Goodwife Rose "ducked," probably by officials.

Wm. Drage, Daimonomageia (London, 1665), 41.



1637. Staffordshire. Joice Hunniman committed, almost certainly

released. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, II, App., 48 b.



1637-38. Lathom, Lancashire. Anne Spencer examined and

probably committed. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports,

XIV, 4 (Kenyon MSS.), 55.



1638. Middlesex. Alice Bastard arraigned on two charges.

Acquitted. Middlesex County Records, III, 112-113.



1641. Middlesex. One Hammond of Westminster tried and

perhaps hanged. John Aubrey, Remaines of Gentilisme

and Judaisme (Folk-Lore Soc.), 61.



temp. Carol I. Oxford. Woman perhaps executed. This

story is given at third hand in A Collection of Modern

Relations (London, 1693), 48-49.



temp. Carol, I. Somerset. One or more hanged. Later the

bewitched person, who may have been Edmund Bull

(see above, s. v. 1626, Taunton), hanged also as a

witch. Meric Casaubon, Of Credulity and Incredulity

(London, 1668), 170-171.



temp. Carol. I? Taunton Dean. Woman acquitted. North,

Life of North, 131.



1642. Middlesex. Nicholas Culpepper of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch,

acquitted. Middlesex County Records, III, 85.



1643. Newbury, Berks. A woman supposed to be a witch

probably shot here by the parliament forces. A

Most certain, strange and true Discovery of a Witch

... 1643; Mercurius Aulicus, Oct. 1-8, 1643; Mercurius

Civicus, Sept. 21-28, 1643; Certaine Informations,

Sept. 25-Oct. 2, 1643; Mercurius Britannicus,

Oct. 10-17, 1643.



1644. Sandwich, Kent. "The widow Drew hanged for a

witch." W. Boys, Collections for an History of

Sandwich, 714.



1645 (July). Chelmsford, Essex. Sixteen certainly condemned,

probably two more. Possibly eleven or twelve more

at another assize. A true and exact Relation ...

of ... the late Witches ... at Chelmesford (1645);

Arthur Wilson, in Peck, Desiderata Curiosa, II,

76; Hopkins, Discovery of Witches, 2-3; Stearne,

Confirmation and Discovery of Witchcraft, 14, 16,

36, 38, 58, etc.; Signes and Wonders from Heaven

(1645), 2; "R. B." The Kingdom of Darkness

(London, 1688). The fate of the several Essex

witches is recorded by the True and Exact Relation

in marginal notes printed opposite their depositions

(but omitted in the reprint of that pamphlet in Howell's

State Trials). "R. B.," in The Kingdom of

Darkness, though his knowledge of the Essex cases

is ascribed to the pamphlet, gives details as to the

time and place of the executions which are often in

strange conflict with its testimony.



1645 (July). Norfolk. Twenty witches said to have been

executed. Whitelocke, Memorials, I, 487. A Perfect

Diurnal (July 21-28, 1645) says that there has been

a "tryall of the Norfolke witches, about 40 of them

and 20 already executed." Signes and Wonders from

Heaven says that "there were 40 witches arraigned

for their lives and 20 executed."



1645. Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Sixteen women and two

men executed Aug. 27. Forty or fifty more probably

executed a few weeks later. A very large number

arraigned. A manuscript (Brit. Mus., Add.

MSS., 27,402, fol. 104 ff.) mentions over forty true

bills and fifteen or more bills not found. A True

Relation of the Araignment of eighteene Witches at

St. Edmundsbury (1645); Clarke, Lives of Sundry

Eminent Persons, 172; County Folk-Lore, Suffolk

(Folk-Lore Soc.), 178; Ady, A Candle in the Dark,

104-105, 114; Moderate Intelligencer, Sept. 4-11,

1645; Scottish Dove, Aug. 29-Sept. 6, 1645.



Stearne mentions several names not mentioned in

the True Relation--names probably belonging to

those in the second group of the accused. Of

most of them he has quoted the confession without

stating the outcome of the cases. They are

Hempstead of Creeting, Ratcliffe of Shelley, Randall

of Lavenham, Bedford of Rattlesden, Wright

of Hitcham, Ruceulver of Powstead, Greenliefe of

Barton, Bush of Barton, Cricke of Hitcham, Richmond

of Bramford, Hammer of Needham, Boreham

of Sudbury, Scarfe of Rattlesden, King of

Acton, Bysack of Waldingfield, Binkes of Haverhill.

In addition to these Stearne speaks of Elizabeth

Hubbard of Stowmarket. Two others from

Stowmarket were tried, "Goody Mils" and "Goody

Low." Hollingsworth, History of Stowmarket

(Ipswich, 1844), 171.



1645. Melford, Suffolk. Alexander Sussums made confession.

Stearne, 36.



1645. Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. At least nine women indicted,

five of whom were condemned. Three women

acquitted and one man. Many others presented. C.

J. Palmer, History of Great Yarmouth, I, 273-274.

Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, IX, App., pt. I, 320 a;

Henry Harrod in Norfolk Archaeol., IV, 249-251.



1645. Cornwall. Anne Jeffries confined in Bodmin gaol and

starved by order of a justice of the peace. She

was said to be intimate with the "airy people" and

to cause marvellous cures. We do not know the

charge against her. Finally discharged. William

Turner, Remarkable Providences (London, 1697),

ch. 82.



1645. Ipswich, Suffolk. Mother Lakeland burnt. The Lawes

against Witches (1645).



1645. King's Lynn, Norfolk. Dorothy Lee and Grace Wright

hanged. Mackerell, History and Antiquities of

King's Lynn, 236.



1645. Aldeburgh, Norfolk. Seven witches hanged. Quotations

from the chamberlain's accounts in N. F.

Hele, Notes or Jottings about Aldeburgh, 43-44.



1645. Faversham, Kent. Three women hanged, a fourth tried,

by the local authorities. The Examination, Confession,

Triall and Execution of Joane Williford, Joan

Cariden and Jane Hott (1645).



1645. Rye, Sussex. Martha Bruff and Anne Howsell ordered

by the "mayor of Rye and others" to be put to the

ordeal of water. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, XIII,

pt. 4, 216.



1645. Middlesex. Several witches of Stepney accused. Signes

and Wonders from Heaven, 2-3.



1645-46. Cambridgeshire. Several accused, at least one or

two of whom were executed. Ady, Candle in the

Dark, 135; Stearne, 39, 45; H. More, Antidote

against Atheisme, 128-129. This may have been

what is referred to in Glanvill's Sadducismus Triumphatus,

pt. ii, 208-209.



1646. Northamptonshire. Several witches hanged. One died

in prison. Stearne, 11, 23, 34-35.



1646. Huntingdonshire. Many accused, of whom at least

ten were examined and several executed, among

them John Wynnick. One woman swam and was

released. John Davenport, Witches of Huntingdon

(London, 1646); H. More, Antidote against Atheisme,

125; Stearne, 11, 13, 17, 19, 20-21, 39, 42.



1646. Bedfordshire. Elizabeth Gurrey of Risden made confession.

Stearne says a Huntingdonshire witch confessed

that "at Tilbrooke bushes in Bedfordshier

... there met above twenty at one time." Huntingdonshire

witches seem meant, but perhaps not alone.

Stearne, 11, 31.



c. 1646. Yarmouth, Norfolk. Stearne mentions a woman

who suffered here. Stearne, 53.



1646. Heptenstall, Yorkshire. Elizabeth Crossley, Mary

Midgley, and two other women examined before two

justices of the peace. York Depositions, 6-9.



1647. Ely, Cambridgeshire. Stearne mentions "those executed

at Elie, a little before Michaelmas last, ...

also one at Chatterish there, one at March there,

and another at Wimblington there, now lately found,

still to be tryed"; and again "one Moores wife of

Sutton, in the Isle of Elie," who "confessed her

selfe guilty" and was executed; and yet again "one

at Heddenham in the Isle of Ely," who "made a

very large Confession" and must have paid the

penalty. Stearne, 17, 21, 37; Gibbons, Ely Episcopal

Records (Lincoln, 1891), 112-113.



1647. Middlesex. Helen Howson acquitted. Middlesex County

Records, III, 124.



1648. Middlesex. Bill against Katharine Fisher of Stratford-at-Bow

ignored. Middlesex County Records, III, 102.



1648. Norwich, Norfolk. Two women burnt. P. Browne,

History of Norwich (Norwich, 1814), 38.



1649. Worcester. A Lancashire witch said to have been tried;

perhaps remanded to Lancashire. A Collection of

Modern Relations. The writer says that he received

the account from a "Person of Quality" who

attended the trial.



1649. Middlesex. Elizabeth Smythe of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields

acquitted. Middlesex County Records, III, 191.



1649. Middlesex. Dorothy Brumley acquitted. Ibid.



1649. St. Albans. John Palmer and Elizabeth Knott said to

have been hanged for witches. The Divels Delusion (1649).



1649. Berwick. Thirty women, examined on the accusation

of a Scotch witch-finder, committed to prison.

Whitelocke, Memorials, III, 99; John Fuller, History

of Berwick (Edinburgh, 1799), 155-156, giving extracts

from the Guild Hall Books; John Sykes,

Local Records (Newcastle, 1833), I, 103-105.



1649. Gloucester. Witch tried at the assizes. A Collection of

Modern Relations, 52.



1649-50. Yorkshire. Mary Sykes and Susan Beaumont committed

and searched. The former acquitted, bill

against the latter ignored. York Depositions, 28.



1649-50. Durham. Several witches at Gateshead examined,

and carried to Durham for trial; "a grave for a

witch." Sykes, Local Records, I, 105; or Denham

Tracts (Folk-Lore Soc.), II, 338.



1649-50. Newcastle. Thirty witches accused. Fourteen

women and one man hanged, together with a witch

from the county of Northumberland. Ralph Gardiner,

England's Grievance (London, 1655), 108;

Sykes, Local Records, I, 103; John Brand, History

and Antiquities of Newcastle (London, 1789), II,

477-478; Whitelocke, Memorials, III, 128; Chronicon

Mirabile (London, 1841), 92.



1650. Yorkshire. Ann Hudson of Skipsey charged. York

Depositions, 38, note.



1650. Cumberland. A "discovery of witches." Sheriff perplexed.

Cal. St. P., Dom., 1650, 159.



1650. Derbyshire. Ann Wagg of Ilkeston committed for

trial. J. C. Cox, Three Centuries of Derbyshire

Annals, II, 88.



1650. Middlesex. Joan Roberts acquitted. Middlesex County

Records, III, 284.



1650. Stratford-at-Bow, Middlesex. Witch said to have been

apprehended, but "escaped the law." Glanvill,

Sadducismus Triumphatus, pt. ii, Relation XX.



1650. Middlesex. Joan Allen sentenced to be hanged. Middlesex

County Records, III, 284. The Weekly Intelligencer,

Oct. 7, 1650, refers to the hanging of a witch

at the Old Bailey, probably Joan.



1650. Leicester. Anne Chettle searched and acquitted. Tried

again two years later. Result unknown. Leicestershire

and Rutland Notes and Queries, I, 247; James

Thompson, Leicester (Leicester, 1849), 406.



1650. Alnwick. Dorothy Swinow, wife of a colonel, indicted.

Nothing further came of it. Wonderfull News from

the North (1650).



1650. Middlesex. Elizabeth Smith acquitted. Middlesex

County Records, III, 284.



c. 1650-60. St. Alban's, Herts. Two witches suspected and

probably tried. Drage, Daimonomageia (1665), 40-41.



1651. Yorkshire. Margaret Morton acquitted. York Depositions, 38.



1651. Middlesex. Elizabeth Lanam of Stepney acquitted.

Middlesex County Records, III, 202, 285.



1651. Colchester, Essex. John Lock sentenced to one year's

imprisonment and four appearances in the pillory.

Brit. Mus., Stowe MSS., 840, fol. 43.



1652. Yorkshire. Hester France of Huddersfield accused before

the justice of the peace. York Depositions, 51.



1652. Maidstone, Kent. Six women hanged, others indicted.

A Prodigious and Tragicall History of the Arraignment

... of six Witches at Maidstone ... by

"H. F. Gent.," 1652; The Faithful Scout, July 30-Aug.

7, 1652; Ashmole's Diary in Lives of Ashmole

and Lilly (London, 1774), 316.



1652. Middlesex. Joan Peterson of Wapping acquitted on

one charge, found guilty on another, and hanged.

Middlesex County Records, III, 287; The Witch of

Wapping; A Declaration in Answer to several lying

Pamphlets concerning the Witch of Wapping; The

Tryall and Examinations of Mrs. Joan Peterson;

French Intelligencer, Apr. 6-13, 1652; Mercurius

Democritus, Apr. 7-14, 1652; Weekly Intelligencer,

April 6-13, 1652; Faithful Scout, Apr. 9-16, 1652.



1652. London. Susan Simpson acquitted. A True and Perfect

List of the Names of those Prisoners in Newgate

(London, 1652).



1652. Worcester. Catherine Huxley of Evesham, charged

with bewitching a nine-year-old girl, hanged. Baxter,

Certainty of the World of Spirits (London, 1691),

44-45. Baxter's narrative was sent him by "the now

Minister of the place."



1652. Middlesex. Temperance Fossett of Whitechapel acquitted.

Middlesex County Records, III, 208, 288.



1652. Middlesex. Margery Scott of St Martin's-in-the-Fields

acquitted. Ibid., 209.



1652. Scarborough, Yorkshire. Anne Marchant or Hunnam

accused and searched. J. B. Baker, History of

Scarborough (London, 1882), 481, using local

records.



1652. Durham. Francis Adamson and ---- Powle executed.

Richardson, Table Book, I, 286.



1652. Exeter, Devonshire. Joan Baker committed. Cotton,

Gleanings ... Relative to the History of ... Exeter

(Exeter, 1877), 149.



1652. Wilts. William Starr accused and searched. Hist.

MSS. Comm. Reports, Various, I, 127.



1652-53. Cornwall. A witch near Land's End accused, and

accuses others. Eight sent to Launceston gaol. Some

probably executed (see above, p. 218 and footnotes

24, 25). Mercurius Politicus, Nov. 24-Dec. 2,

1653; R. and O. B. Peter, The Histories of Launceston

and Dunheved (Plymouth, 1885), 285. See

also Burthogge, Essay upon Reason and the Nature

of Spirits (London, 1694), 196.



1653. Wilts. Joan Baker of the Devizes makes complaint

because two persons have reported her to be a witch.

Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, Various, I, 127. Is this

the Joan Baker of Exeter mentioned a few lines

above?



1653. Wilts. Joan Price of Malmesbury and Elizabeth Beeman

of the Devizes indicted, the latter committed

to the assizes. Ibid.



1653. Yorkshire. Elizabeth Lambe accused. York Depositions, 58.



1653. Middlesex. Elizabeth Newman of Whitechapel acquitted

on one charge, found guilty on another, and

sentenced to be hanged. Middlesex County Records,

III, 217, 218, 289.



1653. Middlesex. Barbara Bartle of Stepney acquitted. Ibid., 216.



1653. Leeds, Yorkshire. Isabel Emott indicted for witchcraft

upon cattle. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, IX, pt. 1, 325 b.



1653. Salisbury, Wilts. Anne Bodenham of Fisherton Anger

hanged. Doctor Lamb Revived; Doctor Lamb's

Darling; Aubrey, Folk-Lore and Gentilisme (Folk-Lore

Soc.), 261; Henry More, An Antidote against

Atheisme, bk. III, chap. VII.



1654. Yorkshire. Anne Greene of Gargrave examined. York

Depositions, 64-65.



1654. Yorkshire. Elizabeth Roberts of Beverley examined.

Ibid., 67.



1654. Wilts. Christiana Weekes of Cleves Pepper, who had

been twice before accused in recent sessions, charged

with telling where lost goods could be found.

"Other conjurers" charged at the same time.

Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, Various, I, 120. See

above, 1610, Norfolk.



1654. Exeter. Diana Crosse committed. Cotton, Gleanings

... Relative to the History of ... Exeter, 150.



1654. Wilts. Elizabeth Loudon committed on suspicion.

Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, Various, I, 129.



1654. Whitechapel, Middlesex. Grace Boxe, arraigned on three

charges, acquitted. Acquitted again in 1656. Middlesex

County Records, III, 223, 293.



1655. Yorkshire. Katherine Earle committed and searched.

York Depositions, 69.



1655. Salisbury. Margaret Gyngell convicted. Pardoned by

the Lord Protector. F. A. Inderwick, The Interregnum,

188-189.



1655. Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Mother and daughter

Boram said to have been hanged. Hutchinson, An

Historical Essay concerning Witchcraft, 38.



1656. Yorkshire. Jennet and George Benton of Wakefield

examined. York Depositions, 74.



1656. Yorkshire. William and Mary Wade committed for

bewitching the daughter of Lady Mallory. York

Depositions, 75-78.



1657. Middlesex. Katharine Evans of Fulham acquitted.

Middlesex County Records, III, 263.



1657. Middlesex. Elizabeth Crowley of Stepney acquitted,

but detained in the house of correction. Middlesex

County Records, III, 266, 295.



1657. Gisborough, Yorkshire. Robert Conyers, "gent.," accused.

North Riding Record Society, V, 259.



1658. Exeter. Thomas Harvey of Oakham, Rutlandshire,

"apprehended by order of Council by a party of

soldiers," acquitted at Exeter assizes, but detained

in custody. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1658-1659, 169.



1658. Chard, Somerset. Jane Brooks of Shepton Mallet

hanged. Glanvill, Sadducismus Triumphatus (1681),

pt. ii, 120-122. (Glanvill used Hunt's book of

examinations). J. E. Farbrother, Shepton Mallet;

notes on its history, ancient, descriptive and natural

(1860), 141.



1658. Exeter. Joan Furnace accused. Cotton, Gleanings ...

Relative to the History of ... Exeter, 152.



1658. Yorkshire. Some women said to have been accused by

two maids. The woman "cast" by the jury. The

judges gave a "respite." Story not entirely trustworthy.

The most true and wonderfull Narration

of two women bewitched in Yorkshire ... (1658).



1658. Wapping, Middlesex. Lydia Rogers accused. A More

Exact Relation of the most lamentable and horrid

Contract which Lydia Rogers ... made with the

Divel (1658). See app. A, Sec. 5, for another tract.



1658. Northamptonshire. Some witches of Welton said to

have been examined. Glanvill, Sadducismus Triumphatus

(1681), pt. ii, 263-268.



1658. Salisbury, Wilts. The widow Orchard said to have

been executed. From a MS. letter of 1685-86,

printed in the Gentleman's Magazine, 1832, pt. I,

405-410.



1659. Norwich, Norfolk. Mary Oliver burnt. P. Brown,

History of Norwich, 39. Francis Blomefield, An

Essay towards a Topographical History of the

County of Norfolk (London, 1805-1810), III, 401.



1659. Middlesex. Elizabeth Kennett of Stepney accused. Middlesex

County Records, III, 278, 299.



1659. Hertfordshire. "Goody Free" accused of killing by

witchcraft. Hertfordshire County Sessions Rolls,

I, 126, 129.



1659-1660. Northumberland. Elizabeth Simpson of Tynemouth

accused. York Depositions, 82.



1660. Worcester. Joan Bibb of Rushock received L20 damages

for being ducked. Gentleman's Magazine, 1856,

pt. I, 39, from a letter of J. Noake of Worcester,

who used the Townshend MSS.



1660. Worcester. A widow and her two daughters, and a

man, from Kidderminster, tried. "Little proved."

Copied from the Townshend MSS. by Nash, in his

Collections for the History of Worcestershire (1781-1799),

II, 38.



1660. Newcastle. Two suspected women detained in prison.

Extracts from the Municipal Accounts of Newcastle-upon-Tyne

in M. A. Richardson, Reprints of Rare

Tracts ... illustrative of the History of the Northern

Counties (Newcastle, 1843-1847), III, 57.



1660. Canterbury, Kent. Several witches said to have been

executed. W. Welfitt ("Civis"), Minutes of Canterbury

(Canterbury, 1801-1802), no. X.



c. 1660. Sussex. A woman who had been formerly tried at

Maidstone watched and searched. MS. quoted in

Sussex Archaeol. Collections, XVIII, 111-113; see

also Samuel Clarke, A Mirrour or Looking Glasse

both for Saints and Sinners, II, 593-596.



1661. Hertfordshire. Frances Bailey of Broxbourn complained

of abuse by those who believed her a witch.

Hertfordshire County Sessions Rolls, I, 137.



1661. Newcastle. Jane Watson examined before the mayor.

York Depositions, 92-93.



1661. Newcastle. Margaret Catherwood and two other

women examined before the mayor. Ibid., 88.



1663. Somerset. Elizabeth Style died before execution. Glanvill,

Sadducismus Triumphatus, pt. ii, 127-146. For

copies of three depositions about Elizabeth Style,

see Gentleman's Magazine, 1837, pt. ii, 256-257.



1663. Taunton, Somerset. Julian Cox hanged. Glanvill,

Sadducismus Triumphatus, pt. ii, 191-198.



1663-64. Newcastle. Dorothy Stranger accused before the

mayor. York Depositions, 112-114.



1664. Somerset. A "hellish knot" of witches (Hutchinson

says twelve) accused before justice of the peace

Robert Hunt. His discovery stopped by "some of

them in authority." Glanvill, Sadducismus Triumphatus,

pt. ii, 256-257. But see case of Elizabeth Style above.



1664. Somerset. A witch condemned at the assizes. She may

have been one of those brought before Hunt. Cal.

St. P., Dom., 1663-1664, 552.



1664. Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Rose Cullender and Amy

Duny condemned. A Tryal of Witches at ... Bury

St. Edmunds (1682).



1664. Newcastle. Jane Simpson, Isabell Atcheson and Katharine

Curry accused before the mayor. York Depositions, 124.



1664. York. Alice Huson and Doll Dilby tried. Both made

confessions. Copied for A Collection of Modern Relations

(see p. 52) from a paper written by the justice

of the peace, Corbet.



1665. Wilts. Jone Mereweather of Weeke in Bishop's Cannings

committed. Hist. MSS. Comm. Reports, Various, I, 147.



1665. Newcastle. Mrs. Pepper accused before the mayor.

York Depositions, 127.



1665. Three persons convicted of murder and executed for

killing a supposed witch. Joseph Hunter, Life of

Heywood (London, 1842), 167-168, note.



1666. Lancashire. Four witches of Haigh examined, two

committed but probably acquitted. Cal. St. P., Dom.,

1665-1666, 225.



1667. Newcastle, Northumberland. Emmy Gaskin of Landgate

accused before the mayor. York Depositions, 154.



1667. Norfolk. A fortune-teller or conjuror condemned to

imprisonment. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1667, 30.



1667. Ipswich, Suffolk. Two witches possibly imprisoned.

Story doubtful. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1667-1668, 4.



1667. Devizes, Wilts. "An old woman" imprisoned, charged

with bewitching by making and pricking an image.

Blagrave, Astrological Practice (London 1689),

90, 103.



1667. Lancashire. Widow Bridge and her sister, Margaret

Loy, both of Liverpool, accused. The Moore Rental

(Chetham Soc., 1847), 59-60.



1668. Durham. Alice Armstrong of Strotton tried, but almost

certainly acquitted. Tried twice again in the next

year with the same result. Sykes, Local Records, II, 369.



1668. Warwick. Many witches "said to be in hold." Cal. St.

P., Dom., 1668-1669, 25.



1669. Hertfordshire. John Allen of Stondon indicted for calling

Joan Mills a witch. Hertfordshire County Sessions Rolls, I, 217.



1670. Yorkshire. Anne Wilkinson acquitted. York Depositions,

176 and note.



1670. Latton Wilts. Jane Townshend accused. Hist. MSS.

Comm. Reports, Various. I, 150-151.



1670. Wilts. Elizabeth Peacock acquitted. See Inderwick's

list of witch trials in the western circuit, in his

Sidelights on the Stuarts (London, 1888), 190-194.

Hereafter the reference "Inderwick" will mean

this list. See also above, p. 269, note.



1670. Devonshire. Elizabeth Eburye and Aliena Walter acquitted.

Inderwick.



1670. Somerset. Anne Slade acquitted on two indictments.

Inderwick.



1670. Bucks. Ann Clarke reprieved. Cal. St. P., Dom., 1670, 388.



1671. Devonshire. Johanna Elford acquitted. Inderwick.



1671. Devonshire. Margaret Heddon acquitted on two indictments.

Inderwick.



1671. Falmouth. Several witches acquitted. Cal. St. P., Dom.,

1671, 105, 171. Perhaps identical with the three, two

men and a woman, mentioned by Inderwick as acquitted

in Cornwall.



1672. Somerset. Margaret Stevens acquitted on two indictments.

Inderwick.



1672. Devonshire. Phelippa Bruen acquitted on four indictments.

Inderwick.



1672. Wilts. Elizabeth Mills acquitted on two indictments.

Inderwick.



1672. Wilts. Elizabeth Peacock, who had been acquitted two

years before, acquitted on five indictments. Judith

Witchell acquitted on two, found guilty on a third.

She and Ann Tilling sentenced to execution. They

must have been reprieved. Inderwick; Gentleman's

Magazine, 1832, pt. II, p. 489-492.



1673. Yorkshire, Northumberland, and Durham. At least

twenty-three women and six men accused to various

justices of the peace by Ann Armstrong, who confessed

to being present at witch meetings, and who

acted as a witch discoverer. Some of those whom

she accused were accused by others. Margaret Milburne,

whom she seems not to have mentioned, also

accused, York Depositions, 191-202.



1674. Northampton. Ann Foster said to have been hanged

for destroying sheep and burning barns by witchcraft.

A Full and True Relation of The Tryal, Condemnation,

and Execution of Ann Foster (1674).



1674. Middlesex. Elizabeth Row of Hackney held in bail for

her appearance at Quarter Sessions. Middlesex

County Records, IV, 42-43.



1674. Southton, Somerset. John and Agnes Knipp acquitted.

Inderwick.



1674? (see above, p. 269, note). Salisbury. Woman acquitted,

but kept in gaol. North, Life of North, 130, 131.



1674-75. Lancashire. Joseph Hinchcliffe and his wife bound

over to appear at the assizes. He committed suicide

and his wife died soon after. York Depositions,

208; Oliver Heywood's Diary (1881-1885), I, 362.



1675. Southton, Somerset. Martha Rylens acquitted on five

indictments. Inderwick.



1676. Devonshire. Susannah Daye acquitted. Inderwick.



1676. Cornwall. Mary Clarkson acquitted. Inderwick.



c. 1679. Ely, Cambridgeshire. Witch condemned, but reprieved.

Hutchinson, Historical Essay concerning Witchcraft, 41.



c. 1680. Somerset. Anna Rawlins acquitted. Inderwick.



c. 1680. Derbyshire. Elizabeth Hole of Wingerworth accused

and committed for charging a baronet with witchcraft.

J. C. Cox, Three Centuries of Derbyshire Annals, II, 90.



1680. Yorkshire, Elizabeth Fenwick of Longwitton





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